Apart from the Indian Premier League, Cummins also spoke about ICC's recent ruling that will now prohibit players to use saliva to maintain the shine on the ball.

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BCCI CEO Rahul Johri, on Wednesday, released a statement saying that the Indian Premier League (IPL) could be held after the monsoon, and this has surely given Australian and Kolkata Knight Riders’ pacer a massive push.

Cummins, in December last year, became the costliest buy in the player auction for the 13th edition of the Indian Premier League when KKR decided to shelve out a whopping Rs. 15.5 crore for the bowler. The tournament, however, has been suspended temporarily due to the outbreak of the global pandemic, but Johri hinted that if the ICC T20 World Cup in Australia is postponed/cancelled, the cash-rich tournament might take place somewhere near October this year.

Speaking about it, Cummins said he is really looking forward to playing it 'for many obvious reasons'.

"Whenever I speak to the owners of the team and the staff there, they're still really confident that it can be played at some stage this year," Cummins told SEN on Thursday.

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"I was really looking forward to playing it for many obvious reasons, hopefully it goes ahead.

"It could be a great way to get back into playing cricket (after the COVID-19 stoppage). It's T20, not as cumbersome on your body. We've got a big World Cup that is going to be played at some stage, so playing as much high-quality T20 cricket as we can is great."

The pacer also spoke about ICC’s recent ruling that will now prohibit players to use saliva to maintain the shine on the ball. He rather urged ICC to allow the use of an artificial substance to shine the ball.

"If we remove saliva, we have to have another option," he told cricket.com.au.

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"Sweat's not bad, but I think we need something more than that, ideally. Whatever that is, wax or I don't know what.

"If that's what that science is telling us, that it's high risk using saliva ... as long as we're keeping other options open, whether that's sweat or something artificial.

"We have to be able to shine the ball somehow so I'm glad they've let sweat remain.

"We've just got to make sure at the start of the spell we're sweating and we're nice and warm."

Feature image courtesy: AFP / Sajjad Hussain