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Fastest T20I tons by New Zealand before Glenn Phillips

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Bringing up his century in just 46 deliveries, New Zealand’s Glenn Phillips became the fastest T20I centurion for his country on Sunday, November 29, as the Kiwis registered a 72-run victory over West Indies.

With New Zealand sealing the three-match T20I series 2-0, we look at three of the fastest T20I centuries scored by Kiwi batsmen before Glenn Phillips arrived.

Colin Munro (47 balls)

The left-handed batsman held the record for the fastest T20I ton by a Kiwi batsman before Phillips broke it. Interestingly, Munro’s scintillating knock had come against the same opponents (West Indies) and at the same venue. Hitting 104 runs in 53 deliveries, Munro had propelled New Zealand to a massive total of 243/5 in 20 overs. West Indies were bundled for just 124 runs while chasing the lost cause as New Zealand won by a massive margin of 119 runs.

Martin Guptill (49 Balls)

Martin Guptill’s century had come in the very next month when New Zealand fans hadn’t yet gotten over Munro’s heroics. Taking 49 balls to reach the milestone, Colin Munro's knock had come against their trans-Tasman rivals, Australia, in Auckland. Guptill had ended up with a score of 105 off in 54 deliveries, which helped New Zealand post a total of 243/6. However, Guptill's century went in vain as half-centuries from David Warner and D'Arcy Short, and cameos from their middle-order saw Australia chase the target with five wickets and seven deliveries to spare.

Brendon McCullum (50 Balls)

Before Munro and Guptill, it was Brendon McCullum who held the record for the fastest T20I hundred by a Kiwi batsman. It came against Australia once again, at Christchurch in 2010. McCullum remained unbeaten on 116 in 56 deliveries to help New Zealand post a total of 214/6. It turned out to be a thriller as Australia mustered the same number of runs in their quota of 20 overs as well. The tie was eventually won by New Zealand in the Super Over.

Feature Image courtesy: Marty Melville / AFP

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